Browsing Tag

Sonic Adventure

Game Secrets, Hacking

Prototype Windy Valley Progress Report: Beta-tastic Magic

Almost a year ago to the day, Sonic Retro forum member Orengefox shared with the world the discovery of two prototypes for Sonic Adventure and its sequel. While to the untrained eye the Sonic Adventure AutoDemo might not have seemed all that special, we here at Retro know better, our elite crack team of technologically-inclined persons more than excited to tear apart reams of code to find the secret caramel-filled goodness hiding underneath.

Indeed, it wasn’t long before all sorts of secrets were uncovered, including earlier versions of Ice Cap and Speed Highway’s “At Dawn” segment. But the deepest, most enticing artifact uncovered was the level architecture from a far earlier version of Windy Valley. Unlike the previously mentioned levels, the prototype Valley couldn’t easily be turned on, what was there full of pointers directed towards a build much earlier than what the AutoDemo used. While other people would get frustrated and walk away, I already stated above how excitable our crack team can get. It was only a matter of time before someone figured out the next step, with Retro Researcher evilhamwizard putting the pieces together, importing the third segment of Windy Valley into the PC version of Sonic Adventure DX:

More after the jump.
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Hardware, Podcasts, Sega Consoles, Sega Retro

Retro Livestream Today — Help Us Look for Sailors at 10PM GMT (6PM EST)


Watch live video from vidyaretro on TwitchTV

It’s been awhile since we last did a live stream. Watch us play through a random assortment of Sega Dreamcast games and maybe we’ll go hunt for some sailors while we’re at it. We’ll be starting the show later today at 10PM GMT. (Or 6PM EST if you prefer.) The stream is over, however you should be able to watch the archived version right here. Or click play on the video above.

Merchandise, Music

Several Sonic Soundtracks Settle onto iTunes

After much fan demand, Sega has begun releasing several of their Sonic series soundtracks on to Apple’s iTunes service. Most of these albums, though recently released, aren’t too easy to track down and import for those looking to legally own the music, never mind worrying about bootlegs.

The albums now available are the 20th Anniversary editions of Sonic CD, Sonic Adventure, Sonic Adventure 2 and Sonic Heroes, as well as “The Best of Crush 40: Super Sonic Songs”, “The Works” (Jun Senoue‘s standalone album featuring several original songs and some Sonic music), and Sonic Colors ViViD SOUND × HYBRiD COLORS, the last one lovingly divided into three volumes for all three discs (Disc 2 and Disc 3 can be found at those links.) Sega further states that the soundtrack to Sonic The Hedgehog 4‘s episodes will also be touching down on iTunes in the future.

It should be noted that the 20th Anniversary album for the two Adventure titles aren’t as all encompassing as their original releases, which may turn some fans off. However, this is the best chance short of importing to show support for the musicians that worked hard to keep series’ reputation for good music alive and well.

Humor

A Brief Defense For Big The Cat

Much has been said about Sonic Adventure, Sonic’s first true foray into 3D gaming. The sprawling levels, the blistering speed, the last moments of precision platforming, and the entire redesign of Sonic the Hedgehog and his world. Even if later rereleases haven’t received the kindest reviews, when it came out it was an amazing game. Even Famitsu, that near-Bible of Japanese news and reviews, gave it one of their highest scores possible, with one reviewer citing that if Ocarina of Time had come out after Sonic Adventure, there’s no way the Zelda title would have received its perfect score.

But no matter who is talking about it, when the low points come about, everyone will assuredly talk about one of the shorter portions of the game, and the one character associated with it. The part that many people point to as the worst part of the game. A section that people now feel vindicated with their hatred because of the events of Summer of Sonic where Iizuka apologized for it. Yes, I am talking about the fishing stylings of Big the Cat.

All I have to say is…why?
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Community, Game Secrets, Interviews

Interview: Yuji Naka and Takashi Iizuka at Summer of Sonic

Saturday, June 25th. A thousand-strong horde of Sonic fans descends upon the Camden Centre in London, to celebrate a video gaming icon with music, games, laughs and chilli dogs. So far, so Summer of Sonic, but this was the 20th anniversary show so there had to be something just a bit special going on, and blimey did they ever deliver on that. How? By getting Yuji Naka and Takashi Iizuka to drop by London to enjoy the festivities, do some signings and some Q&A sessions. That is pretty hard to top, ladies and gents, especially when fans were able to quiz the pair on Madonna, the joint American/Japanese development of Sonic 2, and dat barrel. However, Sonic Retro was also able to get a little more into the bargain and snag an interview slot with Naka and Iizuka. Exciting? I thought so.

Now if you will, allow me to set the scene. Things are behind schedule and everyone is hot and totally knackered, a fact that fellow attendees will attest to. We’re now down to the last interview slot of the day, and another site needs to cram into the session too. We finally get to head in as Jun Senoue takes to the stage to wow everyone downstairs. Still, I know things are going to be at least a little bit good when we’re asked what sites we came from – the mention of our site causes an “Ah, Sonic Retro!” from Iizuka, as he tilts his head back and smiles with a mixture of recognition and amusement. If you were ever in doubt of Retro’s reach, dear reader, that should give you a rough idea of our place in the grand scheme of things.

Then, with little time to spare and more questions than I can possibly ask, we get down to business.

Retro: Naka-san, you joined Sega around the time of its first real console releases, having worked on the SG-1000 and Sega My Card series back in the mid-80s. What was it like to see Sega become a video game publisher that was known all over the world?

Naka: At the beginning, Sega’s real catalyst for success was the arcade, and Sonic pulled it along and really built upon that. Also, the fact that we had hardware and were a first party helped to give us that status in the market, as a global name. So, I feel really happy to be able to be involved, really lucky. It’s really amazing that something created in Haneda, which is not at the centre of Tokyo, sold worldwide.

Hit the post break for the rest of the interview!

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Miscellaneous

Let’s Pretend It’s 1998 For Five Minutes

So I’ve been in a Sonic Adventure kick for a few days now. Looking back at what made the game great, going through how it was developed…there’s no denying that, regardless of how you feel about the game nowadays, the Sonic Team that made that game put a lot of care and effort into it. They gave everything the thought it deserved, didn’t take any one aspect lightly, and somehow had a blast while making it. And they went to a different country just to gain inspiration! That’s nothing to sneeze at.

What some of you may have forgotten, though was the huge media push that went on during the buildup for the first game. And how was it all launched off? With a gala event right in Tokyo, showing off the game for the first time to the masses. Being a thirteen year old kid at the time, I couldn’t attend in person, instead watching a live stream over dial-up at a blazing 33.6k. Sure, I couldn’t understand a word of it, and I could barely make out anything over that RealPlayer stream, but gosh darn it, it was amazing. It was Sonic.

And it wasn’t hosted by this guy:

The above footage was taken from a “video magazine” called Fuse. I bet you wish you were as cool as that guy. Then you could make weird faces when talking about wrestling and awkwardly try to hit on that girl in the video and never get to first base. Yes, he is very late 90’s, but there’s nothing wrong with drifting back to a more simple time. I still want those pins…and that book…

Merchandise

Australia, France and Spain Get A Dreamcast Vinyl

Much like the Sega Mega Drive Ultimate Collection vinyl album given with pre-orders of the game in Australia, Sega is releasing a six-track album to commemorate the release of Dreamcast Collection in Australia, France and Spain.

Australians can get in on picking up this album if they pre-order the game at JB Hi-Fi, though Sega stresses supplies are very limited. It’s currently unknown which retailers will be offering these albums in Europe.

So what’s on the album? On side A, you’ll find “Open Your Heart” from Sonic Adventure and  “Option Remix 2002” from Space Channel 5: Part 2. Side B is nothing but crazy money, containing “Radical Sabbatical”, “Flinch”, and “Get Out” from Crazy Taxi.

Say what you will about the collection of games itself, but this is a pretty nifty pickup for Sega and music enthusiasts.

[SEGA Europe Blog]